Dental Fillings

What is a Filling?

A filling is a way to restore a tooth damaged by decay back to its normal function and shape. When a dentist gives you a filling, he or she first removes the decayed tooth material, cleans the affected area, and then fills the cleaned out cavity with a filling material. By closing off spaces where bacteria can enter, a filling also helps prevent further decay.

Types of Cavity Fillings

Many options are available for tooth fillings, and all of them have their pros and cons. Types of tooth fillings include gold, silver amalgam (a composite of mercury, silver, and other metals), tooth-colored composite material, porcelain, and a special type of glass. The best tooth fillings for you will depend on cost, what your insurance may cover, and your aesthetic preferences.

There is a wide variety of materials used for filling cavities and they vary in strength and color. The two most common types are amalgam and composite.

- Amalgam (silver) Fillings: Amalgam has been used by dental professionals for more than a century; it is the most researched material used for filling cavities. Amalgam fillings are strong and are therefore ideal for filling cavities in the back of the mouth such as in the molars, where chewing takes place. Since they are made of a combination of several metallic elements, amalgam fillings can be noticeable when you laugh or smile. These fillings are among the least expensive of all cavity-filling materials.

- Composite Fillings: Sometimes referred to as composites or filled resins, these fillings feature a combination of glass or quartz filler and can be made to match the color of your tooth. Composite fillings are also fairly durable and are ideal for small-to-mid-size restorations in areas of your mouth that perform moderate chewing.

 

 

- Gold fillings: Gold fillings can cost as much as 10 times more than silver amalgam fillings, but some people prefer the appearance of gold to silver fillings if they want the durability of metal vs. a less-durable composite material.
Ceramic: A ceramic cavity filling (usually made of porcelain) is tooth-colored, and it may be less likely to show tooth stains over time than a composite cavity filling. But price is a factor—a ceramic filling can be nearly as expensive as a gold cavity filling.

- Glass Ionomer: This blend of acrylic and glass is used to create a cavity filling that releases fluoride to help protect teeth. But a glass ionomer cavity filling is less durable than other types, and may need to be replaced in as little as five years.

Taking Care of Cavity Fillings

You may experience some sensitivity and pain after receiving tooth fillings, but this discomfort should subside. Don't neglect your oral care routine. Instead, try products designed specifically to protect sensitive teeth.

When to Replace a Cavity Filling

Tooth fillings usually last for many years before they need to be replaced. But tooth fillings can wear out over years of chewing. If you clench or grind your teeth, you may need to have tooth fillings replaced sooner.

If you notice signs of wear on your tooth fillings, such as cracks or worn areas, see your dentist to have the filling replaced as soon as possible. Continuing to chew with a damaged filling can cause the tooth to crack and require additional repair that is more expensive and more complicated than a simple cavity filling. If additional tooth decay develops around a filling, whether or not the filling is damaged, your dentist may choose to repair the tooth with a crown instead of a second cavity filling.

Other Potential Problems with Cavity Fillings

It’s important to know about potential problems, so you can see your dentist promptly to have cavity fillings adjusted or repaired. Possible complications from cavity fillings include:

Infection: Sometimes a cavity filling will pull away from the tooth to which it is attached, creating a small space. This space can be a breeding ground for bacteria that can cause additional tooth decay. If you notice a space between your tooth and your cavity filling, visit a dentist as soon as possible.

Damage: Sometimes a cavity filling breaks, cracks, or falls out. Damage to a filling can occur when you bite down on something hard or if you are hit in the mouth while playing sports. See a dentist as soon as you notice damage to a cavity filling to avoid irritation and infection of the unprotected tooth.

Sources:
https://crest.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/cavities-tooth-decay/cavity-fillings
https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/procedures/fillings/what-is-a-filling

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 Our Services

Teeth whitening
Tooth filling
Braces/Tooth alignment
Root canal treatment
Treatment of gum diseases
Treatment of bad breath (halitosis)
Replacement of missing teeth

  • Dental Implants
  • Bridge
  • Dentures

Crowns – Gold, Silver, Tooth coloured
Extractions and Dental surgeries
Pediatric Dentistry (Children)

Location:

Rose Avenue,hurlingham.
Off Argwings Kodhek Road
Next to Monarch Hotel
P.O.Box 29522-00100
Nairobi, Kenya

Working Hours

Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 8:00 pm
Saturday 8:00 am - 4:00 pm
Sunday and Public Holidays CLOSED

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Phone No.: +254 (0) 700 609 078
+254 (0) 731 609 078
Email Address: info@emeralddental.co.ke
Website: www.emeralddental.co.ke